LGL Forms field types and descriptions

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What are LGL Form fields?

A field in LGL Forms is a basic unit of data entry in a form. Every field in LGL Forms can be named in a custom way. This means that you can name each field in your form whatever you choose. Fields can be either required or not required. They can also be hidden from view and set up to conditionally display.

Defined fields with a specific purpose

Name: The first and last name and, optionally, any prefix and suffix. This field will automatically map to the constituent name fields in LGL.

Organization/employer: The organization or employer. This field will automatically map to the constituent name field section in LGL.

Email: This field for storing an email address will automatically map to an email address record related to a constituent.

Phone: In the same way as the email field does, this field for storing a phone number will automatically map to a phone number record related to a constituent.

Address: This field is similar to the email and phone fields, except that multiple fields are set up: address line 1, address line 2, city, state, postal code, and country.

Amount: This field is available only in forms that are accepting payments; an amount field captures the amount of the donation or payment.

General fields

Single-line input: General-purpose text input field that’s ideal for capturing short, undefined text from the user submitting the form. Examples include favorite meal or pet name.

Multi-line input: Larger text field that will allow the user to type (and view while they’re typing) multiple lines of text. This field is good for capturing larger, undefined text inputs such as comments, questions, and general notes.

Custom text: Read-only field that doesn’t capture input but allows you to put a formatted block of HTML content in your form at any point. This is ideal for areas where you need to add extra description or information for embedding video, images, bulleted lists, or directions, for example.

Date: A date with a popup calendar.

Number: Similar to single-line input, but this field expects to contain a number and if required will validate that the input data is formatted as a number.

Checkboxes: Allow you to define a set of options from which the user can choose multiple selections. Common examples include volunteer skills or interests, e-news preferences, etc.

Radio buttons: Related to checkboxes but allow only one selection. (A general guideline is that if you have five or more options it’s better to use a dropdown menu. For under five options, it’s okay to use radio buttons.)

Dropdown: Related to checkboxes and radio buttons but allows only one selection. (A general guideline is that if you have five or more options it’s better to use a dropdown menu. For under five options, it’s okay to use radio buttons.)

Section heading: Another read-only field that allows you to break the form up into different sections. By default, each form starts with a contact info field that is a section heading.

File upload: You can put a file upload field into a form to allow users to upload content (images, resumes, or some other scanned piece of documentation) into your form. Each form submission can receive no more than 10 megabytes of data, but your form can contain multiple upload fields.

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